About the author

 Read the Introduction Introduction by Frank Baum

The information on this page is a direct quote from L Frank Baum

Lyman Frank Baum

May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919

Frank Baum was an American author of children’s books, best known for writing The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen novel sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a host of other works (55 novels in total, plus four “lost” novels, 83 short stories, over 200 poems, an unknown number of scripts, and many miscellaneous writings), and made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and screen. His works anticipated such century-later commonplaces as television, augmented reality, laptop computers (The Master Key), wireless telephones (Tik-Tok of Oz), women in high risk, action-heavy occupations (Mary Louise in the Country), and the ubiquity of advertising on clothing (Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Work). Baum is also known to have called for the complete eradication of the Native Americans during the late 19th century.

Frank Baum’s other novels

OZ WORKS

  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900)
  • The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904)
  • Queer Visitors from the Marvelous Land of Oz (1905, comic strip depicting 27 stories)
  • The Woggle-Bug Book (1905)
  • Ozma of Oz (1907)
  • Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908)
  • The Road to Oz (1909)
  • The Emerald City of Oz (1910)
  • The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913)
  • Little Wizard Stories of Oz (1913, collection of 6 short stories)
  • Tik-Tok of Oz (1914)
  • The Scarecrow of Oz (1915)
  • Rinkitink in Oz (1916)
  • The Lost Princess of Oz (1917)
  • The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918)
  • The Magic of Oz (1919, posthumously published)
  • Glinda of Oz (1920, posthumously published)
  • The Royal Book of Oz (1921, posthumous attribution—entirely the work of Ruth Plumly Thompson)

NON-OZ WORKS

  • Mother Goose in Prose (prose retellings of Mother Goose rhymes, (1897)
  • By the Candelabra’s Glare (poetry, 1898)
  • Father Goose: His Book (nonsense poetry, 1899)
  • The Magical Monarch of Mo (Originally published in 1900 as A New Wonderland) (fantasy, 1903)
  • The Army Alphabet (poetry, 1900)
  • The Navy Alphabet (poetry, 1900)
  • Dot and Tot of Merryland (fantasy, 1901)
  • American Fairy Tales (fantasy, 1901)
  • The Master Key: An Electrical Fairy Tale (fantasy, 1901)
  • The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus (fantasy, 1902)
  • The Enchanted Island of Yew (fantasy, 1903)
  • Queen Zixi of Ix (fantasy, 1905)
  • John Dough and the Cherub (fantasy, 1906)
  • Father Goose’s Year Book: Quaint Quacks and Feathered Shafts for Mature Children (nonsense poetry for adults, 1907)
  • The Daring Twins: A Story for Young Folk (novel, 1911; reprinted in 2006 as The Secret of the Lost Fortune)
  • The Sea Fairies (fantasy, 1911)
  • Sky Island (fantasy, 1912)
  • Phoebe Daring: A Story for Young Folk (novel, 1912; announced for reprint by Hungry Tiger Press as Unjustly Accused!)
  • Our Married Life (novel, 1912) [lost]
  • Johnson (novel, 1912) [lost]
  • The Mystery of Bonita (novel, 1914) [lost]
  • Molly Oodle (novel, 1915) [lost]
  • Animal Fairy Tales (fantasy, 1969) (originally published 1905 as a magazine series)

SHORT STORYS

This list omits those stories that appeared in Our Landlady, American Fairy Tales, Animal Fairy Tales, Little Wizard Stories of Oz, and Queer Visitors from the Marvelous Land of Oz.

  • “They Played a New Hamlet” (April 28, 1895)
  • “A Cold Day on the Railroad” (May 26, 1895)
  • “Who Called ‘Perry?'” (January 19, 1896)
  • “Yesterday at the Exhibition” (February 2, 1896)
  • “My Ruby Wedding Ring” (October 12, 1896)
  • “The Man with the Red Shirt” (c.1897, told to Matilda Jewell Gage, who wrote it down in 1905)
  • “How Scroggs Won the Reward” (May 5, 1897)
  • “The Extravagance of Dan” (May 18, 1897)
  • “The Return of Dick Weemins” (July 1897)
  • “The Suicide of Kiaros” (September 1897)
  • “A Shadow Cast Before” (December 1897)
  • “John” (June 24, 1898)
  • “The Mating Day” (September 1898)
  • “Aunt Hulda’s Good Time” (October 26, 1899)
  • “The Loveridge Burglary” (January 1900)
  • “The Bad Man” (February 1901)
  • “The King Who Changed His Mind” (1901)
  • “The Runaway Shadows or A Trick of Jack Frost” (June 5, 1901)
  • “(The Strange Adventures of) An Easter Egg” (March 29, 1902)
  • “The Ryl of the Lilies” (April 12, 1903)
  • the first chapter of The Whatnexters, an unfinished novel with Isidore Witmark (1903, Unpublished and possibly lost)
  • “Chrome Yellow” (1904, Unpublished; held in The Baum Papers at Syracuse University)
  • “Mr. Rumple’s Chill” (1904, Lost)
  • “Bess of the Movies” (1904, Lost)
  • “The Diamondback” (1904, First page missing)
  • “A Kidnapped Santa Claus” (December 1904)
  • “The Woggle-Bug Book: The Unique Adventures of the Woggle-Bug” (January 12, 1905)[51]
  • “Nelebel’s Fairyland” (June 1905)
  • “Jack Burgitt’s Honor” (August 1, 1905)
  • “The Tiger’s Eye: A Jungle Fairy Tale” (1905)
  • “The Yellow Ryl” (1906)
  • “The Witchcraft of Mary–Marie” (1908)
  • “The Man-Fairy” (December 1910)
  • “Juggerjook” (December 1910)
  • “The Tramp and the Baby” (October 1911)
  • “Bessie’s Fairy Tale” (December 1911)
  • “Aunt ‘Phroney’s Boy” (December 1912)
  • “The Littlest Giant—An Oz Story” (1918)
  • “An Oz Book” (1919)

UNDER PSEUDONYMS

As Edith Van Dyne:

  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces (1906)
  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces Abroad (1907)
  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Millville (1908)
  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces at Work (1909)
  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces in Society (1910)
  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces and Uncle John (1911)
  • The Flying Girl (1911)
  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces on Vacation (1912)
  • The Flying Girl and Her Chum (1912)
  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces on the Ranch (1913)
  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces Out West (1914)
  • Aunt Jane’s Nieces in the Red Cross (1915, revised and republished in 1918)
  • Mary Louise (1916)
  • Mary Louise in the Country (1916)
  • Mary Louise Solves a Mystery (1917)
  • Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls (1918)
  • Mary Louise Adopts a Soldier (1919; largely ghostwritten based on a fragment by Baum; subsequent books in the series are by Emma Speed Sampson)

As Floyd Akers:

  • The Boy Fortune Hunters in Alaska (1906; originally published as Sam Steele’s Adventures on Land and Sea by “Capt. Hugh Fitzgerald”)
  • The Boy Fortune Hunters in Panama (1907; originally published as Sam Steele’s Adventures in Panama by “Capt. Hugh Fitzgerald”; reprinted in 2008 as The Amazing Bubble Car)
  • The Boy Fortune Hunters in Egypt (1908; reprinted in 2008 as The Treasure of Karnak)
  • The Boy Fortune Hunters in China (1909; reprinted in 2006 as The Scream of the Sacred Ape)
  • The Boy Fortune Hunters in Yucatan (1910)
  • The Boy Fortune Hunters in the South Seas (1911)

As Schuyler Staunton:

  • The Fate of a Crown (1905)
  • Daughters of Destiny (1906)

As John Estes Cooke:

  • Tamawaca Folks: A Summer Comedy (1907)

As Suzanne Metcalf:

  • Annabel, A Novel for Young Folk (1906)

As Laura Bancroft:

  • The Twinkle Tales (1906; collected as Twinkle and Chubbins, though Chubbins is not in all the stories)
  • Policeman Bluejay (1907; also known as Babes in Birdland, it was published under Baum’s name shortly before his death)

Anonymous:

  • The Last Egyptian: A Romance of the Nile (1908)


Java applet that draws animated bubbles.